WHAT IS AN X-RAY?

X-ray is a type of radiation capable to pass through almost any solid material.
Projection radiography is the practice of producing two-dimensional images using x-ray radiation. Bones contain much calcium, which due to its relatively high atomic number absorbs x-rays efficiently. This reduces the amount of X-rays reaching the detector in the shadow of the bones, making them clearly visible on the radiograph. The lungs and trapped gas also show up clearly because of lower absorption compared to tissue, while differences between tissue types are harder to see.

X-Ray Images of Dogs

On the infographic below, you can see several different types of x-ray images of dogs that we chose for you.

Case 1: DOG LEG FRACTURE

– From Steven Kelly: “Left femur of a Great Pyrenees that jumped out of a second story window. The leg was amputated at the yellow line and the dog is recovering now.”

Case 2: BLADDER AND URETHRAL STONES IN A DOG

– From Alice Hayes: “3 yr old male Poodle. Came in unable to urinate and in pain. Radiograph shows the entire urethra filled with stones and a huge stone in the bladder. The owner elected to euthanize.”

Case 3: CARDIOMEGALY IN A DOG

– From Kayla Hendricks: “4year old great Dane presented for suspected pneumonia. Only symptoms he had at the time were coughing and slightly lethargic. We took an x-ray to check out his lungs and this is what we found.”

Case 4: SIZZLER MAGNETS IN A DOG

– From Sage Crandall: “Dog ate “sizzler” magnets…you know, the really strong kid toys that you toss in the air and they make fun noises. Wreaked havoc on the intestines, but he did well post-op!”

Case 5: BARIUM ASPIRATION IN A DOG

– From Shawna Bacquet Blakely: “Barium Aspiration. One of my favorite X-rays ever. This was many years ago but I remember how shocked I was seeing this. Came from a referring hospital and ended up passing.”

If you liked this article, check out “White Blood Cells – Canine” on our blog.